"I am my beloved's, and my beloved is mine"


On the first day of the week, the 30th day of July, in the year 2000 of the common era, Dan, son of Glenn and Norma, and Elizabeth, daughter of James and Dorothy, joined each other before family and friends to make a mutual covenant as husband and wife, partners in marriage.


The groom, Dan, said to the bride: "I consecrate you to me as my wife according to tradition. I shall treasure you, nourish you, and respect you as those who have devoted themselves to their wives with love and faithfulness and integrity throughout the generations."


The bride, Elizabeth, said to the groom: "I consecrate you to me as my husband according to tradition. I shall treasure you, nourish you, and respect you as those who have devoted themselves to their husbands with love and faithfulness and integrity throughout the generations."


"We, as beloveds and friends, promise each other to strive throughout our lives together to achieve an openness which will enable us to share our thoughts, our feelings, and our experiences. We promise to try always to bring out in ourselves and in each other qualities of forgiveness, compassion, and integrity."


And Elizabeth and Dan pledged together: "We promise to be ever accepting of one another while treasuring each other's individuality; to comfort and support each other through life's disappointments and sorrows; to revel and share in each other's joys and accomplishments; to share our hopes and dreams; to strive for an intimacy that will allow us to accomplish this promise and permit us to become the persons we are yet to be. May we live each day as the first, the last, the only day we will have with each other.


We vow to establish a home open to all of life's potential; a home filled with respect for all people; a home based on love, understanding, and the traditions of our heritage. Let our home be built on understanding and loving kindness. We will strive to raise our children in a home full of love, compassion, joy, hope, generosity, and reverence for learning; a home wherein the flow of the seasons and the passages of life are celebrated through the symbols of our respective heritages; a home open to our family and friends and joined with our community.


All of this we take upon ourselves as valid and binding."


(end)

This is the ketubah we chose: on the left is the sample with standard text, and our finished version is on the right. We had so much text that there wasn't any room to repeat it in Hebrew, so it's English only. You can see other ketubot by this artist at http://www.20thcenturyilluminations.com